Property Management requirements in South Carolina

Must South Carolina property management companies have a real estate broker's license?

NO. South Carolina has a separate limited license for property managers. Real estate brokers and salespeople may also be involved in property management. Property managers must be licensed under a “property manager-in-charge” or a “broker-in-charge.”

A “property manager” is defined as an individual, who, for a fee, salary, or commission, or other valuable consideration or who with the intent or expectation of receiving compensation:

  • Negotiates or attempts to negotiate the rental or leasing of real estate or improvements thereon;
  • Lists or offers to list and provide services in connection with the leasing or rental of real estate or improvements thereon;
  • Advertises or otherwise holds himself out to the public as being engaged in any of the foregoing activities.

    A “property manager in charge” is the property manager who has responsibility for the actions of the associate property managers and who has responsibility and control over and liability for trust accounts.

    Generally, residential property managers are not exempt from the requirement that they have either a property manager license or a broker license, even if they do not engage in leasing activities.

    Are there any exceptions to the requirement that a property manager have a real estate broker's license or a property manager license?

    YES. There are very limited exceptions to the requirement, including one for owners of property.

    For more information about these and other South Carolina property management requirements and exceptions, please contact the South Carolina Real Estate Commission.

    Before hiring a property manager to manage your South Carolina rental property, you should always check that he or she is licensed appropriately. You can check the license status of South Carolina property managers by referring to the state's online license verification service.

    South Carolina Community Association Management Licensing

    There is no requirement that a community association manager or condo association manager in South Carolina hold a real estate broker's license.

    South Carolina Property Manager Licensing Requirements

    South Carolina property manager licensing requirements include:

  • Age: must be at least 18 to be a property manager, and 21 to be a property manager in charge
  • High School: must be a high school graduate or equivalent
  • Education: must complete a commission approved 30 hour course in property management fundamentals. A law degree or B.A. with a major in real estate will also qualify.
  • Exam: must past property management exam and apply for the property manager or property manager in charge license within one year. Exam fee is $63

    South Carolina Real Estate Broker Licensing Requirements

    South Carolina real estate broker licensing requirements include:

  • Age: must be at least 21 years of age
  • High School: must be a high school graduate or equivalent
  • Education: must complete 150 hours of advanced real estate principles and practice and related topics. 90 of those hours may be the hours required for a salespersons license
  • Experience: must show three years active licensure as a salesperson in the last five
  • Exam: must past brokers exam

    South Carolina Real Estate Salesperson Licensing Requirements

    South Carolina real estate salesperson licensing requirements include:

  • Age: must be at least 18 years of age
  • High School: must be a high school graduate or equivalent
  • Education: must complete 60 hour course in real estate fundamentals; in addition in the first year of licensure must complete 30 hours of post license education
  • Exam: must past salespersons exam

    For more information about these and other licensing requirements and exceptions, please contact the South Carolina Real Estate Commission. Specific information about licensing, including applications, is available online.

    IMPORTANT: This information is intended for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should it be considered legal advice or relied upon without first confirming its contents with your state real estate commission. Laws are updated frequently, and this information may not reflect the current law in your state. To confirm the specific requirements for each state, please contact your state real estate commission.

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